Fall TV Premieres I’m Looking Forward To (Returning Shows)

If you’ve been with me for a while, you know that this blog used to largely be a television and movie blog. I had a roster of 20ish shows that I watched religiously every week and any extra money would be spent on dvds of my favorites. Obviously, things have changed since then. I still have a fair amount of shows that I follow, but like books, I’ve also learned to let go. Which is why shows like Modern Family, Grey’s, and Empire have fallen by the wayside.


It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, FXX
(September 5, Wednesdays @ 9)

Sunny is hands down my favorite comedy on tv these days, and while the earlier seasons have been (in my opinion) more consistently funny, I still look forward to tuning in every week and laughing uncontrollably at inappropriate things. Hopefully the decreased presence of Dennis will still bring the same hilarity.


How to Get Away With Murder, ABC
(September 27, Thursdays @ 9)

It’s inevitable that like Grey’s and Scandal, I will one day become tired of this Shondaland show, but I’m still hooked. They’ve gotten away with their, what, 15th murder now and I’m just as invested as ever. But a large part of that has to do with Connor Walsh/Jack Falahee and whoever the new guy is who is playing Annalise’s son. Because, hello, EYE CANDY.


Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, The CW
(October 12, Fridays @ 8)

I will continue to defend this show to death. CXG has one of the most accurate portrayals of mental illness on television and speaks truths about topics that many would shy away from. See: period sex, generalizing men, and healthy sperm. It’s not Santino, but I’m also excited for the return of Greg, if not just for hearing Skylar Astin’s beautiful voice again.  Also, click here for a list of my top 5 favorite songs to date.


Supergirl, The CW
(October 14, Sundays @ 7)

I still enjoy The Flash, but Supergirl is definitely my fave of The CW’s superhero shows. And in recent years, but love was only exacerbated by the appearance of Mon-El/Karamel. But since Chris Wood is sadly no longer a regular, I am hoping my interest in this show stays. Although, I do agree with the general consensus that Kara shouldn’t need a love interest. She’s freaking Supergirl.


The Resident, FOX
(September 24, Mondays @ 8)

I fully admit to only have started this show because of Matt Czuchry—but in the void that Grey’s has left me, The Resident shot to my current favorite medical drama. I like The Good Doctor, but after hearing some dissenting opinions about the portrayal of autism, it’s made me feel somewhat uncomfortable to watch. This show, however, is just pure soapy fun and I’m also very invested in Conrad/Nic.

BLOG TOUR: Darius the Great Is Not Okay, Adib Khorram (August 28, 2018)

I let Dad hold me, like that tiny potato-sack version of myself, sleeping on his chest when I was a baby.

“You’re okay,” he murmured.

“No. I’m not.”

“I know.” He rubbed my back up and down. “It’s okay not to be okay.”

This book has been on the top of my TBR for months. So when Penguin Teen contacted me about being a part of the official blog, I jumped at the chance. DARIUS THE GREAT IS NOT OKAY has everything: a diverse main character, an accurate description and portrayal of mental illness, and realistic family dynamics.


The 411: The son of a Persian woman and a Caucasian man, Darius has never felt like he belonged. He doesn’t speak Farsi. He’s not athletic or fit enough to please his seemingly alpha-male father. The only thing he appears to have in common with him is their daily ritual of taking their medication for depression. Darius would rather master the perfect pot of tea than be the captain of the football team and because of this, he feels even more isolated from his family, his school, and his community.  When his maternal grandfather’s health begins to decline, Darius’ family makes the  trip to Iran to visit before he passes. It’s there where he meets, Sohrab, the teenage neighbor to his grandparents. Soon, they’re spending their days together, playing soccer, eating faludeh, and talking for hours on a secret rooftop overlooking the city’s skyline. Sohrab calls him Darioush–the original Persian version of his name–and Darius has never felt more like himself than he does now that he’s Darioush to Sohrab.


DARIUS THE GREAT IS NOT OKAY tackles a bunch of big issues: the stigma of mental illness, racism, fatphobia, sexual identity…and they’re all covered with a subtlety that feels perfected over the years vs. a debut novel. Sometimes books need to hit you over the head with the message and sometimes the strength of the moral is in the quiet. And that’s where DARIUS lives.

Darius’ struggle with the feeling of not belonging felt overwhelmingly real and personal. I am not biracial, but an international adoptee who grew up in a largely white area and has often felt the sting of not belonging or being in between. Sohrab and Darius’ friendship melted my little heart. I loved seeing Darius feel a part of something for the first time. A place where he intrinsically fit in just because of the person he is. I hope everyone finds their Sohrab. And I hope that everyone has their moment when they are Darioush to someone.

DARIUS THE GREAT IS NOT OKAY is such a feel-good novel that I have a feeling will touch hearts everywhere. I’m incredibly excited to see where Khorram goes from here. We need more Dariuses in our lives.


Adib Khorram is an author, a graphic designer, and a tea enthusiast. If he’s not writing (or at his day job), you can probably find him trying to get his 100 yard Freestyle (SCY) under a minute, or learning to do a Lutz Jump. He lives in Kansas City, Missouri. This is his first novel.

Thank you Penguin Teen for my copy of DARIUS THE GREAT IS NOT OKAY and the bag of Earl Grey Tea—it was the perfect accompaniment to this heartwarming novel.